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Walnut Notes
Table of Contents

      

Heading

Title

Author

Note No.

Stock Production

 

Finding Suitable Seed

Knud E. Clausen

1.01

 

Seed Handling

George Rink

1.02

 

Growing Containerized Seedlings

J. W. Van Sambeek

1.03

 

Seedling Sources

George Rink

1.04

 

Grafting

J. W. Van Sambeek

1.05

 

Black Walnut Cultivars

George Rink

1.06

Establishing the Stand

 

Choosing a Good Walnut Site

Felix Ponder Jr.

2.01

 

Site Preparation

Felix Ponder Jr.

2.02

 

Direct Seeding

J. W. Van Sambeek

2.03

 

Planting Seedlings

J. W. Van Sambeek

2.04

 

Weed Control

Felix Ponder Jr.

2.05

 

Ground Cover Management

J. W. Van Sambeek

2.06

 

Fertilization

Felix Ponder Jr.

2.07

 

Irrigation

Felix Ponder Jr. and F. Danny McBride

2.08

 

Interplanting

J. W. Van Sambeek

2.09

 

Multicropping

Felix Ponder Jr.

2.10

Maintaining Quality and Growth

 

 

Corrective Pruning

Richard C. Schlesinger

3.01

 

Lateral Pruning

Richard C. Schlesinger

3.02

 

First Thinning

Richard C. Schlesinger

3.03

 

Second Thinning

Richard C. Schlesinger

3.04

 

Releasing Walnut in Natural Stands

Felix Ponder Jr. and Richard C. Schlesinger

3.05

 

Revitalizing Stagnating Stands

J. W. Van Sambeek and Richard C. Schlesinger

3.06

Nut Production

 

Nut Production

J. W. Van Sambeek

4.01

Damaging Agents

 

Walnut Anthracnose

Kenneth J. Kessler Jr.

5.01

 

Mycosphaerella Leaf Spot

Kenneth J. Kessler Jr.

5.02

 

Canker Disease

Kenneth J. Kessler Jr.

5.03

 

Walnut Caterpillars and Other Defoliators

Barbara C. Weber

5.04

 

Twig and Stem Borers

J. W. Van Sambeek and Richard C. Schlesinger

5.05

 

Preventing Animal Damage

Barbara C. Weber and J. W. Van Sambeek

5.06

The Business End

 

Record Keeping

J. W. Van Sambeek

6.01

 

Selling Black Walnut

George Rink

6.02

Foreword

When Keats said, "A thing of beauty is a joy forever," he must have been looking at an object made of wood from the black walnut tree.  The sense of magic in the color variations and the light reflections from a figured piece of walnut and the awesome beauty and warmth of the straight-grained wood speak eloquently of the properties of this amazing tree.  More simply stated, the beauty of the wood perpetuates demand.  This is what walnut wood is all about.

The fruit of the walnut tree is all about flavor, a unique flavor that lends mouth-watering goodness to bakery goods, candy, ice cream, and countless other foods.  And it's fun to collect the nuts, whether for eating or for selling.

A large walnut tree as a forest patriarch is eye-stopping.  As you drive along the byways in the summer, the young plantations, too, with their rich green leaves hanging pendiculously like delicate ferns, will catch your eye before any other stand.  And the tree is equally arresting as a provider of shade in your yard.

Black walnut is one of America's most highly prized tree species.  Its natural range extends throughout tthe central and eastern parts of the United States and into southern Ontario.  However, it is commercially significant primarily in the central part of its range.  It typically grows as scattered individuals or in small groups mixed with a wide variety of other hardwoods.  Pure stands of black walnut are rare, but can occur as small groves at the edge of a forest.  Young black walnut trees are intolerant of shade and are seldom found under dense canopies of trees.

Because of heavy use and wasteful cutting over many years, choice black walnut trees are scarce.  Demand remains high however, with expanding world markets that drive up prices for the best logs.  The promise of high prices has stimulated planting, culture, and management of walnut.  this, in turn, has created a demand by walnut growers and land managers for information to conduct these activities.

Supplementing existing reference materials, the Walnut Notes provide information about many topics-information derived from previous publications and research.  They contain management advice in an easily applied form, written exclusively for walnut growers.  When using the Notes, keep in mind that they contain general guidelines; you may need to adapt them at times to your local conditions.

The loose-leaf format will allow us to make revisions and to add more information for you as the technology of black walnut management continues to develop and to add more information for you as the technology of black walnut management continues to develop.  If you would like to receive these additions and revisions in the future, simply complete and send in the postcards on the last page.  We welcome your comments about these Walnut Notes and you suggestions for new Notes.

Robert A. Cecich

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Last modified on Wednesday, February 18, 2004
by  Sharon Hobrla